History of WV Civil War Troops

History of WV Civil War Troops

The following information is taken from Myer’s “History of West Virginia”, 1915.

The population of what is now West Virginia, when the war broke out, was, approximately, 360,000 men, women, and children. Of this number about nine and two-thirds per cent served in the armies – 28,000 in the Federal cause and 7,000 in the Confederate army. The Federals lost 3,200 men and the Confederates 824, or a total loss of 4,024 men during the war.
West Virginia paid out approximately $2,000,000 in the way of bounties and for caring for her soldiers and their families. Following is the roster of West Virginia troops:

First Regiment, three months service. Organized at Wheeling, May, 1861, from volunteer companies from Hancock, Brooke, Ohio and Marshall Counties, at Camp Carlile, Wheeling Island; participated in battle of Philippi, June 3rd, 1861; mustered out of service at Wheeling, August 28, 1861.
First Regiment, three years service. Organized in the Northern Panhandle in the fall of 1861; served three years; non-veterans mustered out of service at Wheeling, November 26, 1864. The veterans, or re-enlisted men, were consolidated with the veterans of 4th Infantry, to form 2nd Veteran Infantry regiment.
Second Regiment, three years service. Organized at Beverly, in August, 1861; consisted of companies from Wood, Taylor and other counties. Company G was transferred to 1st Regiment Light Artillery. By order of June 26, 1864, regiment was changed to Mounted Infantry, but is known thereafter as 5th Regiment Volunteer Cavalry, but never equipped as such. The non-veterans were mustered out of service in August, 1863, and the re-enlisted, 200 in number, consolidated with veterans of the 6th Mounted Infantry (then known as the 6th Regiment Volunteer Cavalry) to form 6th Veteran Cavalry.
Third Regiment, three years service. Formed at Clarksburg, July, 1861. January 26, 1864, regiment was changed to mounted infantry, but henceforth known as 6th Regiment Volunteer Cavalry. The non-veterans were mustered out of service at Beverly, August, 1864, while the re-enlisted men were organized into six companies, consolidated with re enlisted men of 5th Regiment Cavalry – The mounted infantry of the 2nd Regiment – and thus formed the 6th Regiment Veteran Cavalry, which should have been designated in the military establishment as the 1st Regiment Veteran Cavalry.
Fourth Regiment, three years service. Organized at Point Pleasant, June to September, 1861. Non-veterans mustered out of service when time expired in summer of 1864; re-enlisted men consolidated with re-enlisted men of the 1st Regiment Volunteer Infantry, to form 2nd Regiment Veteran Infantry.
Fifth Regiment, three years service. Organized at Ceredo, July and August, 1861. Non-veterans mustered out of service at the expiration of term of service, summer of 1864; re-enlisted men consolidated with re-enlisted men of 9th Regiment Infantry, to form 1st Regiment Veteran Infantry.
Sixth Regiment, three years service. Organized in August, 1861, and by special authority recruited to fifteen companies. Non-veterans mustered out at the end of their term; while the re-enlisted men, together with a large number of recruits, preserved the regimental organization until June 10, 1865, when it was mustered out at Wheeling.
Seventh Regiment, three years service. Organized at Wheeling and Grafton, in July, August, September and October, 1861. No regiment from West Virginia saw harder service. The non-veterans were mustered out at the end of their term of service, but the re-enlisted men, together with recruits, continued the regiment in the field until it was mustered out of service at Munson’s Hill, Virginia, July 1st, 1865.
Eighth Regiment, three years service. Organized in Great Kanawha Valley in autumn of 1861. June 13, 1863, by order of War department, mounted and drilled as mounted infantry. By a second order the 8th Mounted Infantry was changed to 7th Regiment Cavalry. The non-veterans were discharged, but nearly 400 re-enlisted as veterans, and with about 250 recruits, preserved the regimental organization until mustered out of service in 1865.
Ninth Regiment, three years service. Organized at Guyandotte, February 28th, 1862, of companies from Cabell, Wood, Jackson, Mason and Roane; the men in this regiment represented twenty-four counties. In 1864 the non-veterans were discharged, term of service expired, and 357 men re-enlisted, and with the veterans of the 5th Regiment were consolidated and formed the 1st Veteran Infantry Regiment.
Tenth Regiment, three years service. Organization begun in March, 1862; mustered out of service at Richmond, Virginia, August 9th, 1865.
Eleventh Regiment, three years service. Organization begun in December, 1861, but not completed until September, 1862; mustered out of service at Richmond, Virginia, June, 17, 1865.
Twelfth Regiment, three years service. Organized at Camp Wiley, Wheeling Island, November 30th, 1862, composed of companies recruited from Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Marion, Taylor, and Harrison Counties; mustered out of service at Richmond, Virginia, June 16, 1865.
Thirteenth Regiment, three years service. Organized with eight companies at Point Pleasant, October 10th, 1862; mustered out at Wheeling, June 22, 1865.
Fourteenth Regiment, three years service. Organized at Camp Wiley, Wheeling Island, August and September, 1862; mustered out at Cumberland, Maryland, June 27, 1865.
Fifteenth Regiment, three years service. Organized with nine companies at Wheeling, and ordered to field October 16, 1862; the tenth company was organized in February, 1864. Mustered out of service at Richmond, Virginia, June 14, 1865.
Sixteenth Regiment. This regiment has an unique history. It was organized at the old town of Alexandria, on the Potomac River, nine miles below Washington City, and was the only regiment in the Federal service from that part of Virginia east of the Blue Ridge. It was largely composed of men from the counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Fauquier and Prince William, with quite a number from the vicinity of Norfolk. The recorded history of this regiment is very incomplete, hence nothing appears in connected form concerning it in the adjutant-general’s reports.
Seventeenth Regiment, one years service. Organized at Wheeling in August and September, 1864; nearly all the men enlisted for one year; mustered out of service at Wheeling, June 30, 1865.
First Regiment, Veteran Infantry. Regiments were formed by consolidation of re-enlisted men of 5th and 9th Regiments Infantry; mustered out of service at Cumberland, Maryland, July 21st, 1865.
Second Regiment Veteran Infantry. Formed by consolidation of re-enlisted men of 1st and 4th Regiments Infantry; mustered out of service at Clarksburg, July 16, 1865.

Cavalry Artillery Volunteers

First Regiment Light Artillery Vols., three years service. This was the only artillery regiment in the service of the U.S. from W. Va. It consisted of eight batteries, as follows: Battery A, the first battery organized under the Restored Government of Virginia. Its non-veterans were mustered out of service August 8, 1864, its re-enlisted men being added to Battery F. Battery B was mustered out October 23, 1864; its re-enlisted men were added to Battery E. Batteries C and D continued in service until the close of the war. Battery E was recruited at Buckannon, August, 1862. Battery F was organized in 1861 as Company C of the 6th Regiment Infantry, and was transferred to the artillery regiment. It was mustered out of service September 14, 1864; its re-enlisted men, with those previously transferred from Battery A, now reorganized a veteran battery called Battery A. Battery G was organized in 1861 as Company G of the 2nd Regiment Infantry Vols., but was transferred to the artillery regiment; it was mustered out of service August 8th, 1864. Battery H remained in the service until the end of the war. The regiment was mustered out at Wheeling.
The Wheeling Independent Exempt Infantry was a body of infantry consisting of two organizations styled Company A and Company B, which had no regimental connection. They were made up of men enlisted in the Northern Panhandle, who were stationed at Wheeling throughout the war as city guard or, more strictly speaking, Capitol Guards, for Wheeling was not only the seat of the Restored Government, but the capital of West Virginia after the admission of the State into the Union. These two companies were on duty during the entire Civil War period, and were not required to perform other military service.