Soldier’s Record

SOLDIERS’ RECORD
OF
LAWRENCE COUNTY OHIO


Submitted by Peggy A. Wells


Ironton Register, 10 June 1869.

SOLDIERS’ RECORD

Read at Ironton, on Declaration Day, May 29th, 1869.

Second Virginia Cavalry.

Short biographical sketches of Soldiers from Lawrence county, who enlisted in the 2nd West Va. Cav. and sacrificed their lives in defense of their Flag, the Union and Liberty:

Edward B. Thomas, enlisted as a Private in Co. B, Oct. 10, 1862; he was afterwards promoted to Serg’t Major, for his good soldierly qualities. He was killed in a charge of the regiment on the enemy, near Winchester, Va., July 24, 1864. Buried in Kelly’s Cemetery.

Richard A. Kirker, Serg’t. Co. B, captured by being sent into the enemy’s lines with false dispatches, in order to divert the enemy’s attention to a certain quarter, while Gen. Hunter, by whose order he was sent, withdrew his army from in front of Lynchburg, Va., and retreated, as the army at this time was in a very perilous situation. He suffered a long time in the rebel prisons, from the effects of which, he died after he was exchanged and on his way home. He was a good and faithful soldier, and was loved by all who knew him. The date of his capture was June 17, 1864. Buried at Kelly’s Cemetery.

Carey L. Kirker, Bugler Co. B.–Missing in action at Newtown, Va., July 22d, 1864; supposed to have been killed, or died in some horrible prison pen, for no official information has been received in regard to him since the above date. Although young he was a good soldier and always went where duty called him.

John N. Stewart, Com. Serg’t Co, died while a prisoner of war, at Belle Isle, date unknown. He was a good and brave soldier.

Martin Van Every, Serg’t Co. B, died April 20, 1862, in hospital at Charleston, V. Va., of disease contracted in the army.

Braxton P. Reeves, Serg’t Co. B, killed in a sabre charge at Barboursville, Va., made by Co. B. on the rebel Gen. Jenkins Cavalry Brigade, which resulted in his being driven out of town. He was a brave man. Buried at Mount Vernon.

Irwin R. Hailey, Corp’l Co. B, killed in action near Winchester, Va., Sept 5, 1864. He was brave and loved by all who knew him.

Edward Mitchell, Blacksmith, Co. B, died in hospital, at Fayetteville, Va., April 30, 1863, of disease, contracted in the army. He was patriotic and brave. Buried at Hanging Rock. Aged 38. Native of England.

Thos. H. Tomlinson, Bugler, Co. B, found dead at Camp Piatt, Va., Sept. 1, 1863.

James H. Butler, Co. B, drowned in the Ohio river, Oct. 11, 1863.

E. Blankenship, Co. B, died of Pneumonia, Jan. 16, 1864, at his home.

Lewis Conway, Co. B, died at his home in Ironton, June 16, 1863, of disease contracted in the army. He was loyal, true and brave. Buried at Kelly’s Cemetery; was 48-years of age when he died. Native of Wales.

Henry H. Henshaw, Co. B, died at Wytheville, Va. of wounds received in action at the place, July 18, 1863. No purer minded and nobler boy than Henry ever lived. Life to him was a path of duty, which he followed faithfully. He was always found at his post, and was loved and esteemed by all his comrades.

George Hoffman, Co. B, died of wounds received in action near Lewisburg, Va. May 18, 1863. He was a good and brave soldier.

Henry Jones, Co. B, died of wounds received in action near Winchester, Va., Sept. 10, 1864. He was loved and respected by all who knew him. Buried at Hanging Rock.

Amos McKee, Co. B, killed in action at Hager’s Hill, Ky., January 7, 1862. He was a good soldier, and the second soldier who fell from Lawrence county. Buried in Kelly’s Cemetery.

Presley Lunsford, Serg’t Co. G. killed in action at Winchester, Va. July 24, 1864. He was a fine soldier.

John Dundon, Serg’t Co. G, drowned in crossing the Great Kanawha river, Feb’y 26, 1864. He was a good and brave soldier. His body was recovered and buried in the Catholic Cemetery in this city.– Born at Albany, N. Y.

James McConnell, Corp’l Co. G, died in hospital at Cumberland, Md. August 25, 1864, of disease contracted in the army. He was a brave and good soldier.

Jacob Claybaugh, Buglar Co. G, killed at Camp Piatt, June 5, 1864.

George Dunfield, Co. G, died in Libby Prison, Dec. 27, 1863. He was a brave patriot but was starved to death by rebel demons in their prison pens.

Edward Doran, Co. G, died in hospital, at Guyandotte, Va., March 24, 1862. He was respected by all his comrades.

Wm. Dawson, Co. G, died in hospital at Fortress Monroe, April 26, 1865, of wounds received in action. He was a good soldier and fell about the last of the battle.

W. B. Dawson, Co. G, killed in action at Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865. He was a brave soldier and was killed three days before Lee’s surrender.

Albert Harvey, Co. G, killed in action at Lewisburg, Va., May 2d, 1863. He was a good and faithful soldier and was respected by all who knew him. Buried at Kelly’s Cemetery.

Matthew Miller, Co. G, died June 1, 1863, at Camp Piatt, Va., of disease contracted in the field. He was a good soldier. Buried in Catholic Cemetery.

John Goodfellow, Co. G, died in hospital at Sandy Hook, Va., aged 60.

Jacob A. Meyers, Serg’t Co. K, killed in action near Fayetteville, July 4, 1864. He was a brave patriot and was always found at his post of duty.

John Irwin, Co. K, died in hospital of disease (date unknown). He was a good soldier.

John Javens, Co. K, died in hospital of disease (date unknown). He was a good and faithful soldier.

Edward Martin, Co. K, died in hospital of disease (date unknown). He was a brave soldier.

Daniel O’Donnell, Co. K, accidentally killed on the B. & O. R. R., July 19, 1864. He was a good and brave soldier.

James Sweeney, Co. K, killed in action July 4, 1863. He was a very patriotic and brave soldier.

John Moore, Serg’t Co. K, died while a prisoner of war on Belle Isle, Va., (date unknown). He was a brave good soldier.

Wm. L. Colley, Co. B, wounded while on picket near Charlotteville, Va., and left in the hands of the enemy, March 3, 1865. He afterwards died from the wounds. He was a brave soldier.

Stephen P. Drake, Co. B, captured by Mosby’s Guerrillas near Newtown, Va., March 5, 1864, and he with several other prisoners was started with a guard toward rebeldom. The second day after their capture, they killed the guard and escaped to the mountains, but were pursued by other rebels, and it is supposed that he was recaptured and killed, as he was never heard from afterward. He was a good soldier.

John Irwine, Co. B, captured by Mosby’s Guerrillas, near Ashby’ Gap, Va., July 16, 1864 and supposed to have been murdered by them.– He was a brave and good soldier.

John Golden, Co. G, captured while on picket, and died in Andersonville prison pen, July 1st, 1864.– He is buried in the National Cemetery at that place. His grave is No. 2,712. He was a brave soldier.

Samuel Gardner, Co. G, died in Andersonville prison pen, August 4, 1864, and lies buried in the National Cemetery at that place. His grave is No. 4,788. He was a brave soldier.

Next week we give the Lawrence county boys who belonged to the Fifth Va., and who fell in the war.


Ironton Register, 17 June 1869.

SOLDIERS’ RECORD

Read at Ironton, on Decoration Day, May 29th, 1869.

Fifth Virginia Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. D. J. Thomas, Co. A, native of Indiana. Killed at Lynchburg and buried there. His son was taken captive by the rebels after his burial. Was in the service nearly three years. Was 43 years of age when he died. A good man and a brave soldier.

Simeon Hastings, Co. A; native of West Virginia. Killed at second Bull Run. His body was not recovered. Was 25 years of age, and left a wife and 3 children.

Kimber B. Day, Co. A; native of Mason Co., Ky. Volunteered in 1861. Served 15 months. Died at his home in Ironton, of Chronic Diarrhea. Buried at Kelly’s Cemetery. Was 56 years of age when he died. He was above age, but such was his patriotic zeal that he would volunteer in defense of his country. Was in the Seven Days and second Bull Run battles. He was a very powerful, brave and moral man, and much loved. Left a wife and 5 children.

Wm. Warren, Co. K, of Coal Grove, in this county, enlisted at Ceredo, W. Va., and was transferred to Co. H; was mortally wounded on July 24, 1864, at Winchester, where he died. He served with honor to his regiment and country. Left 3 days on the battlefield before his body was recovered. Left a wife and 2 children.

Joseph Corns, Co. A, was born in Allegheny county, Pa. Came to Ironton in 1860. In the Summer of ’61, he enlisted in Co. A, Capt. McFadden. Was killed in action at Franklin, Va., in the Fall of ’62.– His death was instantaneous, being shot through the heart. Buried near Moorfield, Va., at midnight, on the night of his death. He was known as a kind and genial companion, and a brave soldier. His loss was deeply felt by his companions in arms.

Samuel Kirkpatrick, Co. A, died in Wheeling Hospital.

Daniel Forbus, Co. B, was killed in action at Lynchburg, and buried on the field.

W. W. Blankenship, Co. C. Killed at second Bull Run, Aug, 29, 1862.

Thomas Humphreys, Co. C; killed at Waterloo Bridge, Va., August 28, 1862. He was one of the best men. his last words were: “I would be willing to die if I knew my country was safe, and that my dear wife and children would be cared for.” Buried on the field.

Abraham W. Miller, Co. E; killed in a charge near Brownsboro, Va., in a fight with Gen. McCauslin’s cavalry. This gallant soldier fell near a Union man’s house, and his grave was carefully marked, a slip of paper attached to which was written: “Soldier rest thy warfare’s oe’r.” A true and faithful soldier. Resided near Rome in this county.

Ramson Riddle, Co. E; killed at second Bull Run, Aug 27. Buried on the field. Resided near Burlington.

Hugh Duncan, Co. E; killed at Meadow Bluffs by bushwhackers.– Resided near the mouth of Guyan.

Joseph Gosset, Co. E; died at Cabell, buried there.

Samuel Greene, Co. E; killed at Cross Keyes, June 8, 1862, buried on the field.

Thomas Hardy, Co. E; killed at Berryville, Va., Sept. 3, 1864. Fell in a gallant charge, and was buried in his own blanket on the field. He was one of the brave and true.

H. Loudensloke, sergeant Co. E; died at Parkersburg, Va., Dec. 27, 1862.

Henry Slavens, Co. E; died at Parkersburg, and buried there.

William F. Willis, Co. E; died at Parkersburg, Dec. 28, 1861.

J. C. Meadow, Co. E; enlisted in 1861, and served his term out and was discharged. He was special agent for the Provost Department. The rebels came in at Ceredo and killed him. He fought them bravely, and they shot him through the head after he had surrendered. He was buried at Catlettsburg with the honors of war. He was a brave man. Left a wife and 4 children.

Thomas Spradling, Co. I; born in Floyd county, Ky. Enlisted is ’61, and served his whole term; killed instantly by a cannon ball at the battle of Winchester, and was buried on the field. Was 25 years of age. Left a wife and two children who live here. He was a good hearted man and brave soldier.

Frank Spriggs, Co. I; born in Lawrence county, Ky. He served his full term of 3 years. Was wounded at Winchester. His leg was amputated twice. He died there, and was buried in the soldiers’ graveyard. Left a widow and two children. He was a sober, moral and good man.

Henry Bagley, Co. D; died in hospital at Parkersburg, and buried there.

Elijah Brammer, Co. D; killed in action at Kelly’s Ford, Va., August 22, 1862. Buried on the field.

John W. Firmer. Co. D; died at his home in Rome township.

Henry H. Farley, Co. D; died at Gallipolis.

Reuben Lunsford, of Capt. Payne’s Co. of the 9th Va., regiment. Killed at Guyandotte in the first fight.– Buried at Ceredo. Left a wife and 2 children. Was from Symmes Creek.

Lieut. Pressley Lunsford; Killed at Winchester. Resided at Vesuvius Furnace.

Isaac Massie; killed at Guyandotte. Buried at Ceredo.

William Vititoe; killed at Guyandotte. Was from Mount Vernon Furnace.

Coleman B. Waller, sergeant Co. K; killed at Lynchburg, June 18, 1864. He while making a charge on the enemy’s lines. His widow and children live near Rock Camp. He was a true man and a good soldier.

Thomas Dyre, Co. K; killed at Lexington, Va. His family live near Rock Camp.

Willis Cornell, Co. K; killed at Bull Run, August 27, 1862, and buried on the field.

John Kelly, Co. K; killed at Lynchburg, Va., June 18, 1864, and buried on the field.

John Shortridge, Co. K; died at Parkersburg.

William Irindle; died at ————- Creek, Va.


Ironton Register, 24 June 1869

SOLDIERS’ RECORD,

Read at Ironton, on Decoration Day, May 29th, 1869.

Number Three.

1st. W. Va. Light Artillery — Battery B

William Adams; served thirteen months, and was discharged on account of disability, and died of disease contracted in the army Nov. 17, 1864. He was buried here. Was 32 years of age; left a widow and five children.

James Jackson; served faithfully in the 3 months service and joined this battery. Killed at Droop Mountain, Nov. 13, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. From Hanging Rock. 12 months in the service. Aged 19.

Patrick Dowling; born in Ireland. Served two years. Taken prisoner at Lynchburg. Died in the hands of the rebels in his 20th year. Generally loved, faithful and brave.

B. F. Shepherd; spent the first 3 months in Co. A, 18th Ohio. Was wounded by accident in crossing the river by a discharge of his revolver. Before he was fully restored he enlisted in the 2d Battery. Took Typhoid Fever at Cumberland, Md., and after two weeks suffering died in February, 1862. He was one of the first to cross the river in defense of his country; risked his life in going up Sandy river in quest of Col. Zeigler’s family. Was brought home for burial, and was buried with military honors. He was very much respected. Belonged to the Sunday School to the last in civil life, and was not afraid to die.

Abner Fox, died in the hospital at Beverly, W. Va. on the 3d of Oct., 1863, from a wound in the knee received in the battle near White Sulphur Springs, on the 26th of August 1863. Enlisted Oct. 1st, 1861, at Ceredo, and served honestly and bravely. His company sent $102.50 home to his widow. Was 38 years of age, and left a widow and two children.

Wm. Rush; killed at Lynchburg. Shot through the heart. He told the boys the night before that he would be shot the following day.– Buried on the field. Was from this place. Served two and a half years; was a good fellow and brave soldier.

Second Virginia Infantry.

Lieut. Edward John; served 8 months and died at his home in this city, after a suffering of 16 months. He was a brave soldier and an excellent man. Was buried with military honors. Aged 45; native of Wales; left a wife and two children.

Capt. J. S. George’s Independent Company.

Richard Lambert; enlisted in the above company in the three months service. Killed at Scarey Creek, July 17, 1861. Struck by two grape shot, one in the head and the other in the breast. Buried by the rebels where he fell, and his body was recovered by his father in two weeks after his death, together with his revolver and sabra blade. The revolver was claimed by the Capt. afterward and given up. The sabre blade still remains in the family, and also the horse he was riding when he was struck. He was the first killed from this county, and the only man from his company during the three month’s service. He was identified by the shape and state of his teeth, and also by his cavalry pantaloons.

23d Ohio Volunteer Inf.

Maurice P. Daniels, Co. A; killed at the battle of Cloyd Mountain, May 9th, 1864; pierced through the forehead by a musket ball and killed instantly. Buried where he fell.– He was a soldier of the best quality and was lamented by all his comrades.

23d Kentucky Vol. Inft

Patrick Carrol, Co. O; wounded at Vicksburg, Dec. 29, ’62. Died at St. Louis, Feb. 2d, ’63. Aged 29.– Buried in St. Louis.

John Joseph Roup, of the 11th Invalid regiment; died of small-pox near this place. Buried at the Deep Cut. Contracted the disease while guarding a man with the small-pox. Was from California.